Bread - Make It with You (1970)

Bread - Make It with You (1970)






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Make It with You is a song written by David Gates and originally recorded by the pop/rock group Bread, of which Gates was a member. The song was well-received by easy-listening stations at the beginning of the singer-songwriter driven soft rock era, reaching number four on the Billboard Easy Listening Top 40.

The song first appeared on Bread's 1970 album On the Waters. Released as a single in June 1970, it would become the group's first top ten and only number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the U.S., spending the week of August 22, 1970, at the top spot. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 13 song of 1970. The single reached number five on the UK Singles Chart. It was also certified gold by the RIAA for sales of over one million copies.

When the song was released, Gates' mother was asked by a local interviewer how her son's music career was going. Misunderstanding the song's title, Mrs. Gates replied her son, David, and his group had just recorded a song called "Naked With You."


Captain & Tennille - Do That To Me One More Time (1980)

Captain & Tennille - Do That To Me One More Time (1980)
'70s Lite Rock on WLCY Radio




Do That to Me One More Time is a song performed by American pop duo Captain & Tennille. It was their 8th chart-topping hit in the U.S., The song was included on the duo's 1979 album, Make Your Move, and was written by Toni Tennille. It features a Lyricon solo by saxophonist Tom Scott, though Captain mimed to this part on a descant recorder in the promotional video. Even though an edited version was released as a single, yet another version was created for their many TV performances promoting the song. This version contained a "natural" ending, opposed to the fade-out ending that was featured on the single and album versions. This version was mainly lip-synced by Tennille on such TV programs.

After a decline in popularity from the height of their success in the mid-1970s, the Captain and Tennille signed with Casablanca Records under the guidance of Neil Bogart. "Do That to Me One More Time" was a comeback for the duo, but they failed to achieve further success on Casablanca and their contract was not renewed. Vocalist and songwriter Toni Tennille played the song for Bogart at her house with husband Daryl Dragon in Pacific Palisades, California on an electric piano. Bogart reacted enthusiastically, saying: "That's a smash! There's no doubt in my mind that's going to be your first single.

Bobby Vee - Take Good Care Of My Baby (1961)

Bobby Vee - Take Good Care Of My Baby (1961)



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Take Good Care of My Baby is a song written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin and made famous by Bobby Vee, when it was released in 1961. It quickly became popular, reaching #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in September. The song is noted for being incredibly similar in musical structure to "Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen" by Neil Sedaka.

The song was covered by The Beatles during their audition at Decca Records on January 1, 1962. Dion also recorded a version, though it was not released as a single. Gary Lewis & The Playboys recorded a cover version in 1965 on their She's Just My Style album. In 1968, it became a hit again, this time for Bobby Vinton, but his version reached only #33 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in comparison. Vee re-recorded the song as a ballad in 1973 on his album Ain't Nothing Like a Sunny Day (released under his real name, Robert Thomas Velline). However, it's his original version, along with Vinton's, that remain as staples of oldies radio stations.

It has also been covered by for instance Smokie (Solid Ground, 1981), Micky Dolenz, and German Pop Star Sasha (Dick Brave and the Backbeats, 2003).

Delaney & Bonnie - Do Right Woman - Do Right Man (1969)

Delaney & Bonnie - Do Right Woman - Do Right Man



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Singer Bonnie Bramlett might be the blackest-sounding white soul singer to ever draw breath, and that’s saying something. Here, along with her husband—the gifted multi-instrumentalist Delaney Bramlett—the duo’s second album (released in July 1969) oozes the American South. It doesn’t hurt that the musicians backing them all have heightened senses of musical empathy (Leon Russell, Bobby Whitlock, Rita Coolidge, Bobby Keys, Jim Keltner, and others). It’s a hip-grinding masterpiece that’s part back-porch gospel (“Get Ourselves Together,” “The Gift of Love”), city slang (“Someday,” “The Ghetto”), and oily R&B (“When the Battle Is Over”). The slinky “I Can’t Take It Much Longer” is all Memphis in the nighttime, while the strangely profound “Dirty Old Man” (cowritten by Mac Davis) hits hard with its swampy swing, punchy horn section, and key changes—it sounds like a great Tony Joe White song. A slow-burning take of Penn/Morman’s canonical “Do Right Woman—Do Right Man” makes it the definitive version, and that’s saying something too. It’s no wonder that George Harrison signed Delaney & Bonnie to The Beatles' Apple Records after hearing this.

Arthur Conley - Sweet Soul Music from the album Only In America: Atlantic Soul Classics (1967)

Arthur Conley - Sweet Soul Music from the album Only In America: Atlantic Soul Classics (1967)



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Sweet Soul Music is a soul song, first released by Arthur Conley in 1967. Written by Conley and Otis Redding, it is based on the Sam Cooke song "Yeah Man" from his posthumous album Shake; the opening riff is a quote from Elmer Bernstein's score for the 1960 movie The Magnificent Seven.
It reached the number two spot on both the Billboard Hot 100 and the Billboard R&B chart, and #7 on the UK Singles Chart. J. W. Alexander, Sam Cooke's business partner, sued both Redding and Conley for plagiarizing the melody. A settlement was reached in which Cooke's name was added to the writer credits, and Otis Redding agreed to record some songs in the future from Kags Music, a Cooke – JW Alexander enterprise.

Gordon Lightfoot - Early Mornin' Rain (1966)

Gordon Lightfoot - Early Mornin' Rain (1966)



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Early Morning Rain (sometimes "Early Mornin' Rain") is a song composed and recorded by Canadian singer-songwriter Gordon Lightfoot. The song appears on his debut album Lightfoot! (1966) and in a re-recorded version on the 1975 compilation Gord's Gold.
Lightfoot composed the song in 1964, supposedly inspired by seeing off a friend at the Los Angeles airport some years previous. The lyrics suggest someone down on his luck, standing by an airport fence and observing the thunderous takeoff of a Boeing 707 jetliner. The general narrative of the song can be taken as a sort of jet-age musical allegory to a hobo of yesteryear lurking around a railroad yard attempting to surreptitiously board and ride a freight train.

Harry Nilsson - Everybody's Talkin' (From Midnight Cowboy) (1969)

Harry Nilsson - Everybody's Talkin' (From Midnight Cowboy) (1969)



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Everybody's Talkin' is a folk rock song written and originally released by Fred Neil in 1966. A version of the song performed by Harry Nilsson became a global success in 1969, reaching #2 and #6 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart and Pop Singles chart respectively, and winning a Grammy after it was featured on the soundtrack of the film Midnight Cowboy. The song, which describes the singer's desire to retreat from other people to the ocean, is among the most famous works of both artists, and has been covered by many other notable performers. The song later appeared in the 1994 film Forrest Gump and is also on the film's soundtrack album. It also appeared in the comedy film Borat and on The Hangover Part III soundtrack.

Norman Greenbaum - Spirit In The Sky (1969)

Norman Greenbaum - Spirit In The Sky (1969)



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Spirit in the Sky is a song written and originally recorded by Norman Greenbaum and released in late 1969. The single sold two million copies in from 1969 to 1970 and reached number three in the U.S. Billboard chart (April 18, 1970) where it listed for 15 weeks in the Top 100. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 22 song of 1970. It also climbed to number one on the UK, Australian and Canadian charts in 1970. Rolling Stone ranked "Spirit in the Sky" #333 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The song was featured on the 1969 album of the same name. Cover versions by Doctor and the Medics and Gareth Gates have also made the number 1 spot in the UK.

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Foreigner - Cold as ice (1977)

Foreigner - Cold as ice (1977)



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Cold as Ice is a 1977 song by British-American rock band Foreigner from their eponymous debut album. It became one of the best known songs of the band in the U.S., peaking at number 6 in the Billboard Hot 100. It was initially the B-side of some versions of the "Feels Like the First Time" 45 rpm single.

"Cold as Ice" was used as the soundtrack for a skit on the March 25, 1978 broadcast of Saturday Night Live that showed a man being attacked by a woman in a number of grisly ways. Host Christopher Lee introduced the segment as being "not for the squeamish".

Paul Simon - Slip Slidin' Away (1977)

Paul Simon - Slip Slidin' Away (1977)



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Slip Slidin' Away is a 1977 song written and recorded by Paul Simon, from his compilation album Greatest Hits, Etc.. It was one of two new songs to appear on the album, the other being "Stranded in a Limousine". Backing vocals on the song are provided by The Oak Ridge Boys. The song was originally recorded and considered for Simon's 1975 album Still Crazy After All These Years, but Simon decided not to include the song on the finished album. A demo version appears on the 2004 re-issue of the album.

"Slip Slidin' Away" was released as a single in October 1977 and became a major hit, peaking at #5 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart.

The song is referenced in the 1996 video game Super Mario 64 in the level "Cool, Cool Mountain". One of the missions where Mario has to go down an icy slide is called "Slip Slidin' Away".

Frankie Valli - Can't Take My Eyes Off You (1967)

Frankie Valli - Can't Take My Eyes Off You (1967)



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Can't Take My Eyes Off You is a 1967 single by Frankie Valli. The title is a shortened version of the composers' title of "Can't Take My Eyes Off of You", which has led to long-term confusion over the song's title. The song was among Valli's biggest hits, reaching #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and earning a gold record. It was Valli's biggest "solo" hit until he hit #1 in 1975 with "My Eyes Adored You". "Can't Take My Eyes Off You" has had a major cultural impact, with hundreds of cover versions, many of which have been on the charts themselves in different countries. The song is a staple of television and film soundtracks, even being featured as part of the plot of some films, such as when the lead characters sing or arrange their own version of the song. The Valli version was also used by NASA as a wake-up song for a mission of the Space Shuttle, on the anniversary of astronaut Christopher Ferguson.

America - Lonely People (1974)

America - Lonely People (1974)



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Lonely People is a song written by the husband-and-wife team of Dan and Catherine Peek and performed by America. The track was the second release from America's 1974 album Holiday. "Lonely People" reached number five on the Billboard Hot 100, Dan Peek's only credited song to reach that chart's top 10, and was America's second number one on the Easy Listening chart, where it stayed for one week in February 1975.

"Lonely People" was not automatically earmarked for the Holiday album: Peek unsuccessfully submitted a demo of the song for John Sebastian to consider recording.

"Lonely People" was written as an optimistic response to the Beatles' song "Eleanor Rigby". Peak considered "Eleanor Rigby" an "overwhelming" "picture...of the masses of lost humanity, drowning in grey oblivion" and would recall being "lacerated" on first hearing the lyrics of its chorus which run "All the lonely people: where do they all come from...where do they all belong". "Lonely People" was written within a few weeks of Peek's 1973 marriage to Catherine Mayberry: Peek- "I always felt like a melancholy, lonely person. And now [upon getting married] I felt like I’d won." The lyrics of "Lonely People" advise "all the lonely people": "Don't give up until you drink from the silver cup", a metaphor which Peek thus explains: "It's possible to drink from another's well of experience...and be refreshed."

Dan Peek would recall that in his post-America solo career he would utilize "Lonely People" to close his concerts, introducing the song "with words to the effect" "that Jesus is the answer to loneliness". On the advice of a fan Peek began amending the actual lyrics of the song to convey this pro-Christian message and Peek recorded a lyrically revised version of "Lonely People" for his 1986 album Electro Voice. This revised version amended the original lyrics "And ride that highway in the sky" and "You never know until you try" to "And give your heart to Jesus Christ."

Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons - My Eyes Adored You (1974)

Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons - My Eyes Adored You





My Eyes Adored You (original working title, "Blue Eyes in Georgia") is a popular song written by Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan. It was originally recorded by The Four Seasons in early 1974. After the Motown label balked at the idea of releasing it, the recording was sold to lead singer Frankie Valli for $4000. After rejections by Capitol, Atlantic, and other labels, Valli succeeded in getting the recording released on Private Stock Records, but the owner/founder of the label wanted only Valli's name on the label. The single was released in the U.S. in November 1974 and topped the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1975. "My Eyes Adored You" also went to #2 on the Easy Listening chart. Billboard ranked it as the No. 5 song for 1975.

The single was Valli's first #1 hit as a solo artist, and remained there for one week, being knocked out of the top spot by another Crewe/Nolan-penned song, "Lady Marmalade". Although it was released as a Valli solo effort, the song is sometimes included on Four Seasons compilation albums. It is from the album Closeup.

The success of "My Eyes Adored You" triggered a revival of interest in recordings by Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. The group was subsequently signed to Warner Bros. Records as Valli's follow-up single, "Swearin' to God" was climbing to #6 on the Hot 100. Three months later, The Four Seasons visited the Top Ten for the first time since 1967 with "Who Loves You".

Special of the day: Dream Lover By Bobby Darin (1959)

Special of the day: Dream Lover By Bobby Darin (1959)



"Dream Lover" is a song written and recorded by Bobby Darin on March 5, 1959. Darin decided to stretch out some chord changes he found on the piano, and add strings and voices. It was produced by Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler and engineered by Tom Dowd. The song became a multi-million seller, reaching #2 in US charts for a week and #4 on the R&B charts. "Dream Lover" was kept from the number one spot by "The Battle of New Orleans" by Johnny Horton and went to #1 in UK for four weeks during June and July 1959 respectively. It was released as a single on Atco Records in 1959. In addition to Darin's vocal, the song features Neil Sedaka on piano. A picture sleeve, featuring a portrait of Darin, was also issued for this record.

The song is featured in the 1991 movie Hot Shots! starring Charlie Sheen. A remake of the song performed by Dion is also played in full, during the end credits. The song was also used in Michael Apted's 1974 movie Stardust and in Barry Levinson's 1982 debut film Diner. A version of the song, retitled "Dream Maker" and with rewritten lyrics, appears in the pilot of the 1987 TV series Rags to Riches.