Showing posts with label 1967. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1967. Show all posts

The Grass Roots - Let's Live For Today on The Best Of The Grass Roots (1967)

The Grass Roots - Let's Live For Today - WLCY Radio Hits
"Let's Live for Today" is a song written by David Shapiro, Ivan Mogul, and Michael Julien, and initially recorded by the English band The Rokes in 1966. The song was later popularized by the American rock band The Grass Roots, who released it as a single on May 13, 1967. The Grass Roots' version climbed to #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, eventually selling over two million copies and being awarded a gold disc. The song was also included, as the title track, on The Grass Roots' second album, Let's Live for Today. Since its initial release, The Grass Roots' rendition of the song has become a staple of Oldies radio programming in America and is today widely regarded as a 1960s classic.



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Similar Tracks

Get Together by The Youngbloods
Bella Linda by The Grass Roots
Where Were You When I Needed You by The Grass Roots
Never My Love by The Association

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Ray Charles - Here We Go Again on Ray Charles Anthology (1967)

Ray Charles - Here We Go Again on Ray Charles Anthology (1967)




"Here We Go Again" is a country music standard written by Don Lanier and Red Steagall that first became notable as a rhythm and blues single by Ray Charles from his 1967 album Ray Charles Invites You to Listen. It was produced by Joe Adams for ABC Records/Tangerine Records. To date, this version of the song has been the biggest commercial success, spending twelve consecutive weeks on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at number 15.

The most notable cover version is a rhythm and blues duet by Charles and Norah Jones, which appeared on the 2004 album Genius Loves Company. This version has been the biggest critical success. When Genius Loves Company was released, "Here We Go Again" earned Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Best Pop Collaboration at the 47th Grammy Awards posthumously for Charles who died in 2004. Another notable version by Nancy Sinatra charted for five weeks in 1969. Johnny Duncan charted the song on Billboard's Hot Country Songs chart for five weeks in 1972, while Roy Clark did so for seven weeks in 1982.

The song has been covered in a wide variety of musical genres. In total, five different versions have been listed on the music charts. Although its two most successful versions have been rhythm and blues recordings, many of its other notable covers were featured on country music albums. "Here We Go Again" was first covered in an instrumental jazz format, and many of the more recent covers have been sung as duets, such as one with Willie Nelson and Norah Jones with Wynton Marsalis accompanying. The song was released on their 2011 tribute album Here We Go Again: Celebrating the Genius of Ray Charles. The song lent its name to Red Steagall's 2007 album as well. Cover versions have appeared on compilation albums by a number of artists, even some who did not release "Here We Go Again" as a single.
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Johnny Rivers - Baby I Need Your Lovin' (1967) on Anthology (1964-1977) Album

Johnny Rivers - Baby I Need Your Lovin'  (1967) on Anthology (1964-1977) Album




"Baby, I Need Your Lovin'" was a slower, 1967 cover by Johnny Rivers. It reached #3 on Billboard Hot 100, topping the original version in chart performance. It is included on his 1967 album Rewind.

"Baby I Need Your Loving" is a 1964 hit single recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label. Written and produced by Motown's main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song was the group's first Motown single and their first pop Top 20 hit, making it to number eleven on the Billboard Hot 100 in the fall of 1964. It was also their first million-selling hit single. Rolling Stone ranked The Four Tops' original version of the song at #390 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Johnny Rivers is known to some rock and roll aficionados as the king of the cover, and not without reason. Over the course of his career, he had several hits (and near misses) with covers of previously recorded songs, as well as with a number of never-before released records. Johnny Rivers had thirteen charted hits in the period from 1964 to 1967, with roughly equal numbers of original and cover recordings. His covers were of modestly successful songs, all of which had received airplay on Top 40 stations in the preceding several years. For example, Rivers released covers of "Memphis," "Maybellene," and "Mountain of Love" in 1964, each of which was recorded in front of a live audience in Rivers' rollicking, rocking style; none would be a giant hit, but his versions of "Memphis" and "Mountain of Love" have become standards in the rock and roll canon. Covers are remakes of records by different artists, but in the rock vernacular there is usually more to it than that. Especially in the mid-to-late 1950s, the term "cover" implied a remake (by a white recording artist) of a record originally cut by a black artist, and therefore not played on the many predominantly white-oriented radio stations. The first "Cover King" was Pat Boone, who recorded several songs after Little Richard, The Charms, Ivory Joe Hunter, or Fats Domino had achieved successes with them, primarily on black R&B radio stations.
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Sam & Dave - Soul Man (1967) from the album Soul Men

Sam & Dave - Soul Man (1967) from the album Soul Men




"Soul Man" is a 1967 song written by Isaac Hayes and David Porter, first successful as a number 2 hit single by Atlantic Records soul duo Sam & Dave.

Co-author Isaac Hayes found the inspiration for "Soul Man" in the turmoil of the civil rights movement of the 1960s. In July 1967, watching a television newscast of the aftermath of the 12th Street riot in Detroit, Michigan, Hayes noted that black residents had marked buildings that had not been destroyed during the riots – mostly African-American owned and operated institutions – with the word "soul". Relating this occurrence to the biblical story of the Passover, Hayes and songwriting partner David Porter came up with the idea, in Hayes' words, of "a story about one's struggle to rise above his present conditions. It's almost a tune [where it's] kind of like boasting 'I'm a soul man'. It's a pride thing."

It was at Stax that Sam and Dave found their métier. The group was paired with a relatively unknown and untried house songwriting team, Isaac Hayes and David Porter. With the former largely responsible for the harmony and instrumental arrangements and the latter in charge of lyrics and vocal performance, Hayes And Porter would become perhaps the final songwriting team in the history of soul. Among their classic compositions are Sam and Dave's "Soul Man." Hold on, I'm Comin'." "When Something Is Wrong with My Baby." "Wrap It Up." and "I'll Thank You." These songs, in essence defined soul music in the latter half of the 1960s.

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Neil Diamond - Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon (1967)

Neil Diamond - Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon (1967)
'60s #1 Hits On WLCY Radio





"Girl, You'll Be a Woman Soon" is a song written by Neil Diamond, whose recording of it on Bang Records reached #10 on the U.S. pop singles chart in 1967. The song enjoyed a second life when it appeared on the 1994 Pulp Fiction soundtrack, performed by rock band Urge Overkill. Other versions have been recorded by Cliff Richard (1968), Gary Puckett and the Union Gap (1969), the Biddu Orchestra (1978), and 16 Volt (1998).

The song first appeared on Diamond's album Just for You. The mono and stereo versions of this song differ slightly. On the mono "Just For You" LP as well as on the 45, the strings do not come in until the second verse. It also has a slightly longer fade. The stereo "Just For You" LP version has a shorter fade and the strings come in on the first chorus.
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Arthur Conley - Sweet Soul Music from the album Only In America: Atlantic Soul Classics (1967)

Arthur Conley - Sweet Soul Music from the album Only In America: Atlantic Soul Classics (1967)



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Sweet Soul Music is a soul song, first released by Arthur Conley in 1967. Written by Conley and Otis Redding, it is based on the Sam Cooke song "Yeah Man" from his posthumous album Shake; the opening riff is a quote from Elmer Bernstein's score for the 1960 movie The Magnificent Seven.
It reached the number two spot on both the Billboard Hot 100 and the Billboard R&B chart, and #7 on the UK Singles Chart. J. W. Alexander, Sam Cooke's business partner, sued both Redding and Conley for plagiarizing the melody. A settlement was reached in which Cooke's name was added to the writer credits, and Otis Redding agreed to record some songs in the future from Kags Music, a Cooke – JW Alexander enterprise.
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Frankie Valli - Can't Take My Eyes Off You (1967)

Frankie Valli - Can't Take My Eyes Off You (1967)



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Can't Take My Eyes Off You is a 1967 single by Frankie Valli. The title is a shortened version of the composers' title of "Can't Take My Eyes Off of You", which has led to long-term confusion over the song's title. The song was among Valli's biggest hits, reaching #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and earning a gold record. It was Valli's biggest "solo" hit until he hit #1 in 1975 with "My Eyes Adored You". "Can't Take My Eyes Off You" has had a major cultural impact, with hundreds of cover versions, many of which have been on the charts themselves in different countries. The song is a staple of television and film soundtracks, even being featured as part of the plot of some films, such as when the lead characters sing or arrange their own version of the song. The Valli version was also used by NASA as a wake-up song for a mission of the Space Shuttle, on the anniversary of astronaut Christopher Ferguson.
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