Showing posts with label 1970. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1970. Show all posts

Creedence Clearwater Revival - Run Through The Jungle on Chronicle (1970)

Creedence Clearwater Revival - Run Through The Jungle
"Run Through the Jungle" is a 1970 rock song recorded by California-based band Creedence Clearwater Revival.

The song was written by Creedence's lead singer, guitarist and songwriter, John Fogerty. It was included on their 1970 album Cosmo's Factory, the group's fifth album. The song's title and lyrics, as well as the year it was released (1970), have led many to assume that the song is about the Vietnam War. The fact that previous Creedence Clearwater Revival songs such as "Fortunate Son" were protests of the Vietnam War added to this belief.



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However, in a 2016 interview, Fogerty explained that the song is actually about the proliferation of guns in the United States.

"The thing I wanted to talk about was gun control and the proliferation of guns... I remember reading around that time that there was one gun for every man, woman and child in America, which I found staggering. So somewhere in the song, I think I said, '200 million guns are loaded.' Not that anyone else has the answer, but I did not have the answer to the question; I just had the question. I just thought it was disturbing that it was such a jungle for our citizens just to walk around in our own country at least having to be aware that there are so many private guns owned by some responsible and maybe many irresponsible people."

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The Hollies
Buffalo Springfield
The Animals
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John Fogerty
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Eric Burdon & War - Spill the Wine from the album Eric Burdon Declares "War" (1970)




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"Spill the Wine" is a 1970 song performed by Eric Burdon and War. Released as a single in May 1970 (backed by the non-album track "Magic Mountain"), it was War's first chart hit, peaking at number three in the US. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 20 song of 1970. It was also a top three hit in Canada and Australia. It charted #15 in Netherlands and #28 in Germany.

An edited version, released as a promo single for radio stations and subsequently included on most compilations, omits the middle spoken recitation, plus one chorus. A sound of a French woman is heard in the background. A flute solo also dominates the song.

The Guess Who - No Sugar Tonight from the album American Woman (1970)

The Guess Who - No Sugar Tonight from the album American Woman (1970)



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"No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature" is a song by the Canadian rock band The Guess Who. It was released on their 1970 album American Woman, and was released on the B-side of the "American Woman" single without the "New Mother Nature" section. The single was officially released as "No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature" and peaked at #1 on the RPM magazine charts (three weeks) and #5 on the Billboard Hot 100. In Cash Box, which at the time ranked sides independently, "No Sugar Tonight" reached #39.

King Floyd - Groove Me - On Choice Cuts Album (1970)

King Floyd - Groove Me - On Choice Cuts Album (1970)
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"Groove Me" is a song recorded by R&B singer King Floyd. Released from his eponymous album in late 1970, it was a crossover hit, spending four non-consecutive weeks at number-one on Billboard Soul chart and peaking at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song was recorded and produced by Wardell Quezergue at Malaco Records' Jackson, Mississippi recording studios during the same session as another Quezergue-produced song, Jean Knight's "Mr. Big Stuff". "Groove Me" was originally released as the B-side to Floyd's "What Our Love Needs" on the Malaco subsidiary Chimneyville. When New Orleans disc jockey George Vinnett started playing the B-side, the song began meriting attention, and as the record emerged as a local smash, Atlantic Records scooped up national distribution rights.

Blues Image - Ride Captain Ride - On Open Album (1970)

Blues Image - Ride Captain Ride - On Open Album (1970)
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"Ride Captain Ride" is a song recorded by the American rock band Blues Image. The song was co-written by the band's singer-guitarist Mike Pinera and keyboardist Frank "Skip" Konte. It was included on the group's 1970 album, Open. Released as a slightly shortened single in the spring of 1970, it shot up the charts, eventually reaching No. 4 in the USA and Canadian charts, making it Blues Image's first (and only) Top 40 chart hit. The guitar fills and main solo were performed by Kent Henry. Mike Pinera plays the guitar solo at the end of the song.

The song was inspired by the number of keys on Pinera's Rhodes piano. Pinera said, "Okay, I need a first word. And what came into my head was '73.' I liked the rhythm, and I went, '73 men sailed up, from the San Francisco Bay.' ... The song sort of just wrote itself from there."

The song was eventually remixed as a "psychedelic space version".

George Harrison - My Sweet Lord (1970)

George Harrison - My Sweet Lord (1970)
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"My Sweet Lord" is a song by English musician and former Beatle George Harrison that was released in November 1970 on his triple album All Things Must Pass. Also issued as a single, Harrison's first as a solo artist, "My Sweet Lord" topped charts worldwide and was the biggest-selling single of 1971 in the UK. In America and Britain, the song was the first number 1 single by an ex-Beatle. Harrison originally gave the song to his fellow Apple Records artist Billy Preston to record; this version, which Harrison co-produced, appeared on Preston's Encouraging Words album in September 1970.

Harrison wrote "My Sweet Lord" in praise of the Hindu god Krishna, while at the same time intending the lyrics to serve as a call to abandon religious sectarianism through his deliberate blending of the Hebrew word hallelujah with chants of "Hare Krishna" and Vedic prayer. The recording features producer Phil Spector's Wall of Sound treatment and heralded the arrival of Harrison's much-admired slide guitar technique, which one biographer described as being "musically as distinctive a signature as the mark of Zorro". Preston, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and the group Badfinger are among the other musicians appearing on the recording.

Later in the 1970s, "My Sweet Lord" was at the centre of a heavily publicised copyright infringement suit, due to its similarity to the Ronnie Mack song "He's So Fine", a 1963 hit for the New York girl group the Chiffons. In 1976, Harrison was found to have subconsciously plagiarised the earlier tune, a verdict that had repercussions throughout the music industry. He claimed to have used the out-of-copyright "Oh Happy Day", a Christian hymn, as his inspiration for the song's melody.

Harrison performed "My Sweet Lord" at the Concert for Bangladesh in August 1971, and it remains the most popular composition from his post-Beatles career. He reworked the song as "My Sweet Lord (2000)" for inclusion as a bonus track on the 30th anniversary reissue of All Things Must Pass. Many artists have covered the song including Andy Williams, Peggy Lee, Edwin Starr, Johnny Mathis, Nina Simone, Julio Iglesias, Richie Havens, Megadeth, Boy George, Elton John, Jim James, Bonnie Bramlett and Elliott Smith. "My Sweet Lord" is ranked 460th on Rolling Stone magazine's list of "the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". The song reached number 1 in Britain for a second time when re-released in January 2002, two months after Harrison's death. As of 2014, "My Sweet Lord" remains the last number 1 hit in the UK by a former member of the Beatles.

Christie - Yellow River (1970)

Christie - Yellow River (1970)
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"Yellow River" is a popular song recorded by the British band Christie. Written by band leader Jeff Christie, the song was offered to The Tremeloes, who recorded it with the intention of releasing it as a single early in 1970. However, after the success of their then most recent single, "Call Me Number One", and after considering it too pop-orientated for their future direction, they decided to follow it up with another of their own compositions, "By The Way", which was only a minor Top 40 success.

Producer Mike Smith therefore took their vocals off the recording and added those of Jeff Christie. Released on 23 April 1970, it became an international hit, reaching number one on the UK Singles Chart for one week in June 1970. In the US, it reached number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.

The actual location of Yellow River in this song is not specified, although the author, Jeff Christie, is on record as saying that it was inspired by the idea of a soldier going home at the end of the American Civil War. As the song was released during the Viet Nam War, it has been interpreted as being about a soldier leaving the US Military at the end of his period of conscription.

Neil Diamond - Cracklin' Rosie (1970)

Neil Diamond - Cracklin' Rosie (1970) on WLCY Radio
WLCY Radio The superseventies Music - '70s Lite Rock




"Cracklin' Rosie" is a 1970 song written and recorded by Neil Diamond in 1970, with instrumental backing by L.A. sessions musicians from the Wrecking Crew, from his album Tap Root Manuscript. This was Neil Diamond's first American #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in October 1970, and his third to sell a million copies. It became Diamond's breakthrough single on the UK Singles Chart in 1970, reaching #3 in December 1970. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 17 song of 1970. It also reached #2 on the Australian Singles Chart.

The single version released by Uni Records in 1970 was in mono, while the album version from Tap Root Manuscript was in stereo.

The Guess Who - American Woman (1970)

The Guess Who - American Woman (1970) On WLCY Radio
WLCY Radio The superseventies Music




"American Woman" is a song by Canadian rock band The Guess Who, first released in January 1970 on the album of the same name and later in March as a single, which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. Backed with "No Sugar Tonight," Billboard ranked it as the No. 3 record of 1970.

The song has been covered by many rock artists, including Lenny Kravitz and Krokus. The song was included in Guitar Hero World Tour and Rock Band 2.

Creedence Clearwater Revival - Who'll Stop The Rain (1970)

Creedence Clearwater Revival - Who'll Stop The Rain (1970)



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"Who'll Stop the Rain" is a song written by John Fogerty and originally recorded by Creedence Clearwater Revival for their 1970 album Cosmo's Factory. Backed with "Travelin' Band", it was one of three double-sided singles from that album to reach the top five on the Billboard Pop Singles chart and the first of two to reach the #2 spot on the American charts, alongside "Lookin' Out My Back Door". In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked it #188 on its "500 Greatest Songs of All Time" list.

Free - All Right Now (1970)

Free - All Right Now (1970) On WLCY Radio




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All Right Now is a rock single by the English rock band Free. The song, released in mid-1970, hit #2 on the UK singles chart and #4 on the US Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. "All Right Now" originally appeared on the album Fire and Water, which Free recorded on the Island Records label, formed by Chris Blackwell. In 1991, the song was remixed and re-released, reaching #8 on the UK singles chart.

"All Right Now" was a #1 hit in over 20 territories and was recognised by ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers) in 1990 for garnering 1,000,000 plus radio plays in the U.S. by late 1989. In 2006 the BMI London awards included a Million Air award for 3 million air plays of All Right Now in the USA.

According to drummer Simon Kirke, "All Right Now" was written by bassist Andy Fraser and singer Paul Rodgers in the Durham Students' Union building, Dunelm House.

One of the engineers during the recordings of "All Right Now" was Roy Thomas Baker, who would later become Queen's producer (he mixed "Killer Queen", "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "Don't Stop Me Now" among others).

Bread - Make It with You (1970)

Bread - Make It with You (1970)






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Make It with You is a song written by David Gates and originally recorded by the pop/rock group Bread, of which Gates was a member. The song was well-received by easy-listening stations at the beginning of the singer-songwriter driven soft rock era, reaching number four on the Billboard Easy Listening Top 40.

The song first appeared on Bread's 1970 album On the Waters. Released as a single in June 1970, it would become the group's first top ten and only number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the U.S., spending the week of August 22, 1970, at the top spot. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 13 song of 1970. The single reached number five on the UK Singles Chart. It was also certified gold by the RIAA for sales of over one million copies.

When the song was released, Gates' mother was asked by a local interviewer how her son's music career was going. Misunderstanding the song's title, Mrs. Gates replied her son, David, and his group had just recorded a song called "Naked With You."


Three Dog Night - Mama Told Me (Not To Come)

Three Dog Night - Mama Told Me (Not To Come) on WLCY Radio


Mama Told Me (Not to Come) is a song by American singer-songwriter Randy Newman written for Eric Burdon's first solo album in 1966. Three Dog Night's 1970 pop rock cover of the song topped the U.S. pop singles charts. Stereophonics's cover also hit number four on the U.K. Singles Chart in 2000.

The first recording of "Mama Told Me Not to Come" was cut by Eric Burdon & The Animals. A scheduled single-release of September 1966 was withdrawn, but the song was eventually included on their 1967 album Eric Is Here.

Also in 1970, Three Dog Night released a longer, rock 'n roll and funk-inspired version (titled "Mama Told Me (Not to Come)") on It Ain't Easy.

Three Dog Night's version had the same 3/4 by 2/4 time change as Eric Burdon's version and featured Cory Wells singing lead in an almost humorous vocal-style, Jimmy Greenspoon playing a Wurlitzer electric piano, and Michael Allsup playing his guitar, which sounds like a violin on the recording.

Billboard ranked the record as the No. 11 song of 1970. The single was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America on July 14, 1970, the same day that It Ain't Easy was certified gold.

This was the very first #1 song played on the July 4, 1970 broadcast of American Top 40.

Edwin Starr - War (song)

Edwin Starr - War (song) on WLCY Radio


War is a counterculture era soul song written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong for the Motown label in 1969. Whitfield first produced the song – a blatant anti-Vietnam War protest – with The Temptations as the original vocalists. After Motown began receiving repeated requests to release "War" as a single, Whitfield re-recorded the song with Edwin Starr as the vocalist, with the label deciding to withhold the Temptations' version from single release so as not to alienate their more conservative fans. Starr's version of "War" was a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1970, and is not only the most successful and well-known record of his career, but it is also one of the most popular protest songs ever recorded. It was one of 161 songs on the Clear Channel no-play list after September 11, 2001.

The Supremes - Someday We'll Be Together

The Supremes - Someday We'll Be Together
"Someday We'll Be Together" is a song written by Johnny Bristol, Jackey Beavers, and Harvey Fuqua and made popular as the last of twelve American number-one pop singles for Diana Ross & the Supremes on the Motown label. Although it was released as the final Supremes song featuring Diana Ross, who left the group for a solo career in January 1970, it was recorded as Ross' first solo single and Supremes members Mary Wilson and Cindy Birdsong do not sing on the recording. Both appear on the B-side, "He's My Sunny Boy."

The single topped the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart for one week. Reaching number-one on the American pop chart in the final 1969 issue of Billboard magazine (dated December 27), the single was not only the final number-one in 12 chart-topping pop hits for The Supremes, but it also holds the distinction of being the final American number-one hit of the 1960s.


Bread - It Don't Matter To Me

Bread - It Don't Matter To Me
Bread peaked at #127 on Billboard's (North America) Pop Albums chart. A remake of "It Don't Matter to Me" charted in 1970 after the release of Bread's second album. It peaked at #2 and #10 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary and Pop Singles charts, respectively.

The album's cover, with whimsical depictions of the band members photos on paper currency, refers to contemporary slang equating "bread" to money.

The Carpenters - Close To You (1970)

The Carpenters - Close To You
"(They Long to Be) Close to You" is a popular song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. It was first recorded by Richard Chamberlain and released as a single in 1963 as "They Long to Be Close to You", without parentheses. However, it was the single's flip side, "Blue Guitar", that became a hit. The tune was also recorded as a demo by Dionne Warwick in 1963 and re-recorded with a Burt Bacharach arrangement for her 1964 album Make Way for Dionne Warwick, and was released as the B-side of her 1965 single "Here I Am". Bacharach released his own version in 1968. But the version recorded by The Carpenters, which became a hit in 1970, is the best known.

In 1970, it was released by Karen and Richard Carpenter on their album Close to You, and it became their breakthrough hit. The song stayed at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks.

Chicago - Colour My World (1970)

Chicago - Colour My World (1970)
'70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio




"Colour My World" is a song written by American musician James Pankow, one of the founding members of the rock/jazz fusion band Chicago. Part of Pankow's "Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon" song cycle/suite, it was recorded for their second album Chicago, also called Chicago II (1970). Terry Kath is heard in the lead vocal, and Walter Parazaider performs the highly recognizable flute solo.

The song was initially released as the B-side to "Make Me Smile" in March 1970. It was re-released in June 1971 as the B-side to the re-release of "Beginnings"; this second single reached #7 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

"Colour My World" became a popular "slow-dance" song at high school proms and university dances during the 1970s.

James Taylor - Fire And Rain

James Taylor - Fire And Rain
"Fire and Rain" is a folk rock song written and performed by James Taylor. It appeared on his second album, Sweet Baby James. The album was released in February 1970, with the song being released as a single that month. "Fire and Rain" hit #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts. It eventually sold over a million US singles, but never received its corresponding certification.

Carole King is the pianist on the song. Drummer Russ Kunkel used brushes rather than sticks on his drum kit and Bobby West played double bass using a bow.

"Fire and Rain" is in the 227th position on Rolling Stone′s list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

Edison Lighthouse - Love Grows Where My Rosemary Goes

Edison Lighthouse - Love Grows Where My Rosemary Goes on WLCY Radio




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"Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)" is a popular song by "one-hit wonder" Edison Lighthouse. The single hit the number one spot on the UK Singles Chart on the week ending on 31 January 1970, where it remained for a total of five weeks.