Showing posts with label 1975. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1975. Show all posts

Olivia Newton-John - Please Mr. Please from the album Have You Never Been Mellow (1975)

Olivia Newton-John - Please Mr. Please from the album Have You Never Been Mellow (1975)



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"Please Mr. Please" is the title of a popular song from 1975 by the Australian singer Olivia Newton-John. The song was written by Bruce Welch and John Rostill, both members of British pop singer Cliff Richard's backing band, The Shadows. Welch had originally recorded the song himself in 1974 with no commercial success. The song appears on Newton-John's album, Have You Never Been Mellow.

Released as a single in 1975, "Please Mr. Please" reached the Top 10 on three major Billboard charts in the U.S. that year. On the pop chart, the song peaked at #3 in August 1975, remaining in the Top 40 for 12 weeks: Newton-John's fifth consecutive Top Ten hit, "Please Mr. Please" would also mark Newton-John's last appearance in the Top Ten for a three-year period. On the country chart, the song reached #5, while on the adult contemporary chart, the song spent three weeks at #1. The single was a certified Gold record by the RIAA.
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Frankie Valli - Swearin' to God from the album Closeup (1975)

Frankie Valli - Swearin' to God from the album Closeup (1975) WLCY Radio



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"Swearin' to God" is a song written by Bob Crewe and Denny Randell. It was recorded by Frankie Valli and released in May 1975 as a single from his album Closeup. It's a love song whose lyrical hook is a more literal use of the expression "I swear to God" (i.e., "I mean this sincerely"):

I'm swearin' to God / So glad He's givin' me you

Valli's first disco-style song (it runs four minutes as a single but just over ten minutes on the album), "Swearin' to God" features Patti Austin singing a response to Valli's praise in the bridge. It is one of Valli's best known songs.[citation needed] "Swearin' to God" hit number 6 on the U.S. Billboard charts and also charted in the UK (#31).
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Eagles - One of These Nights from the album One of These Nights (1975)

Eagles - One of These Nights from the album One of These Nights (1975) WLCY Radio



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"One of These Nights" is a song written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey and recorded by the American rock band the Eagles. The title track from their One of These Nights album, the song became their second single to top the Billboard Hot 100 chart after "Best of My Love" and also helped propel the album to number one. The single version was shortened from the album version of the song, removing most of the song's intro and most of its fade-out, as well. Henley is lead vocalist on the verses, while Randy Meisner sings high harmony (not lead) on the refrain. The song features a guitar solo by Don Felder that is "composed of blues-based licks and sustained string bends using an unusually meaty distortion tone."

The song was a conscious attempt by the band to write something different from a country-rock and ballad-type song. Don Henley said: "We like to be a nice little country-rock band from Los Angeles ... about half the time". He added: "We wanted to get away from the ballad syndrome with "One of These Nights." With Don Felder in the band now, we can really rock." Frey said that they "wanted 'One of These Nights' to have a lot of teeth, a lot of bite—a nasty track with pretty vocals."
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ABBA - S.O.S - On ABBA Album (1975)

ABBA - S.O.S - On ABBA Album (1975)
'70s Pop Morning on WLCY Radio




"SOS" was the third single from Swedish pop group ABBA's self-titled 1975 album, their third for Polar Music and their second for Epic and Atlantic. It was released with "Man in the Middle" as the B-side. Agnetha Fältskog, who sang lead, recorded the song in Swedish on her 1975 solo album Elva kvinnor i ett hus. "SOS" was ABBA's first major worldwide hit since "Waterloo" and, to date, is the only Hot 100 single (or #1 single in Australia) in which both the title and the credited act are palindromes.

"SOS" marked a huge turnaround in ABBA's fortunes, most notably in the UK and Ireland, where it returned the group to the Top 10 for the first time since "Waterloo". Reaching #6 and #4 respectively, "SOS" started a run of 18 consecutive Top 10 hits for ABBA in the UK and Ireland. "SOS" reached #1 in Australia, Belgium, France, West Germany (where it spent 7 weeks at the top), New Zealand and South Africa, and was a Top 3 hit in Austria, the Netherlands, Norway, Italy (where it became ABBA's most successful hit), Mexico, Rhodesia and Switzerland. The song also became ABBA's second Top 20 hit in the United States, peaking at #15 (due to the single charting in the U.S. before "I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do", whereas elsewhere "SOS" charted afterwards).

Chicago radio station WLS, which gave "SOS" much airplay, ranked the song as the 61st biggest hit of 1975. It peaked at number six on their survey of 22 November 1975.

"SOS" is one of the most-covered of ABBA's songs. It has been recorded and performed in concert by several prominent artists, including John Frusciante, Peter Cetera, and Chris deBurgh.

The track has a number of music industry devotees. The Who guitarist Pete Townshend has said "SOS" is one of the best pop songs ever written, adding that when he first heard the song he "was transported by it".

Former Beatle John Lennon declared that it was one of his favourite pop songs, while Ray Davies of The Kinks said that he was taken with the song after seeing the group perform it on the television show Seaside Special.
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War - Why Can't We Be Friends? - From The Album Why Can't We Be Friends? (1975)

War - Why Can't We Be Friends? - From The Album Why Can't We Be Friends? (1975)
'70s Pop Morning on WLCY Radio




"Why Can't We Be Friends?" is a song by the band War. The song has a simple structure, with the phrase "Why can't we be friends?" being sung four times after each two-line verse amounting to over forty times in under four minutes. The song reached #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1975. It had the dubious honor of being played in outer-space , when NASA beamed it to the linking of Soviet cosmonauts and U.S. astronauts for the Apollo–Soyuz Test Project ,also in 1975.. Billboard ranked it as the No. 23 song of that year ,on it's year-end,Top 100 songs list.

The song is played during the freshman hazing scene in Dazed and Confused. It also plays over the main credits in Lethal Weapon 4, was also covered in BASEketball, Bridge to Terabithia, and played in The Final Destination. A clip of the song is played as Homer Simpson's entrance music in Season 8 Episode 3 of The Simpsons, "The Homer They Fall". American pop rock band Smash Mouth covered the song on their debut album Fush Yu Mang in 1997, releasing it as their second single.
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Neil Sedaka - Bad Blood - On The Definitive Collection Album (1975)

Neil Sedaka - Bad Blood - On The Definitive Collection Album (1975)
'70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"Bad Blood" is a popular song written by Neil Sedaka and Phil Cody. The song, with uncredited backing vocals by Elton John, reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1975, remaining in the top position for three weeks. It was certified gold by the RIAA and was the most successful individual commercial release in Sedaka's career. "Bad Blood" was replaced at the #1 spot by John's single, "Island Girl".
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Ted Nugent - Stranglehold - On Ted Nugent Album (1975)

Ted Nugent - Stranglehold - On Ted Nugent Album (1975)
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"Stranglehold" is a single and the first track from Ted Nugent's self-titled 1975 album. The vocals are performed not by Nugent, but by Derek St. Holmes. The "Sometimes you wanna get higher" verse is sung by Ted himself. In Martin Popoff's book, "Epic Ted Nugent", Nugent admits that the song "Stranglehold" was co-written by Rob Grange, yet he never received a share for co-writer. "Stranglehold" would set the stage for Nugent's career, a guitar-driven track over eight minutes long - its famous guitar solo having been recorded in a single take.

Stranglehold has been ranked 31st greatest guitar solo of all time by Guitar World.
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Chicago - Old Days - On Chicago VIII Album (1975)

Chicago - Old Days - On Chicago VIII Album (1975)
Chicago '70s Pop Morning on WLCY Radio




"Old Days" is a song written by James Pankow for the group Chicago and recorded for their album Chicago VIII (1975), with lead vocals by Peter Cetera. The second single released from that album, it reached #5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on the Easy Listening chart.
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Glen Campbell - Rhinestone Cowboy - On Rhinestone Cowboy Album (1975)

Glen Campbell - Rhinestone Cowboy - On Rhinestone Cowboy Album (1975)
Glen Campbell The Soft Pop '70s on WLCY Radio





"Rhinestone Cowboy" is a song written by Larry Weiss and most famously recorded by American country music singer Glen Campbell with instrumental backing by the Wrecking Crew, L.A. session musicians. The song enjoyed immense popularity with both country and pop audiences when it was released in 1975.

Released in May 1975, "Rhinestone Cowboy" immediately caught on with both country and pop audiences. The song spent that summer climbing both the Billboard Hot Country Singles and Billboard Hot 100 charts before peaking at No. 1 by season's end - three non-consecutive weeks on the country chart, two weeks on the Hot 100. Billboard ranked it as the No. 2 song for 1975.

During the week of September 13 — that was the week the song returned to No. 1 on the Billboard country chart, after having been nudged out for a week by "Feelins'" by Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn — "Rhinestone Cowboy" topped both the country and Hot 100 charts simultaneously. This was the first time a song had accomplished the feat since November 1961, when "Big Bad John" by Jimmy Dean turned the trick.

"Rhinestone Cowboy" was one of six songs released in 1975 that topped both the Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard Hot Country Singles charts. The other songs were "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" by Freddy Fender; "(Hey Won't You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song" by B.J. Thomas, "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" and "I'm Sorry"/"Calypso," both by John Denver; and "Convoy" by C.W. McCall.

The song was also the sole Glen Campbell track in a promotional-only compilation album issued by Capitol records titled "The Greatest Music Ever Sold" (Capitol SPRO-8511/8512), that was distributed to record stores during the 1976 Holiday season as part of Capitol's "Greatest Music Ever Sold" campaign, which promoted 15 "Best Of" albums released by the record label.
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Melissa Manchester - Midnight Blue - On Melissa Album (1975)

Melissa Manchester - Midnight Blue - On Melissa Album (1975)
Melissa Manchester '70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio





"Midnight Blue" is a song by Melissa Manchester. Taken from the album Melissa, it was written by Manchester with lyricist Carole Bayer Sager in 1973. It reached #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1975 and topped the Billboard Easy Listening chart for two weeks.

The song is heard on the radio in the 1978 film Ice Castles. An excerpt from "Midnight Blue" ("Wouldn't you give your hand to a friend?") is included among 12 others in the 1975 novelty hit song by Dickie Goodman entitled "Mr. Jaws".

The song has also been recorded by Shirley Bassey, Cristy Lane, Johnny Mathis, Arthur Prysock, Vanessa Williams and Viola Wills. An Italian rendering: "E L'Amore Che Muore", was recorded by Wess & Dori Ghezzi for their 1977 album Insieme.
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Barry Manilow - I Write The Songs - On Ultimate Manilow Album (1975)

Barry Manilow - I Write The Songs - On Ultimate Manilow Album (1975)
Barry Manilow '70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio





"I Write the Songs" is a popular song written by Bruce Johnston in 1975 and made famous by Barry Manilow. Manilow's version reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in January 1976 after spending two weeks atop the Billboard adult contemporary chart in December 1975. It won a Grammy Award for Song of the Year and was nominated for Record of the Year in 1977. Billboard ranked it as the No. 13 song of 1976.

The original version was recorded by The Captain & Tennille, who worked with Johnston in the early 1970s with The Beach Boys. It appears on their 1975 album, Love Will Keep Us Together. The first release of I Write the Songs as a single was by then teen-idol David Cassidy from his 1975 solo album The Higher They Climb, which was also produced by Bruce Johnston. Cassidy's version reached #11 on the UK Singles Chart in August of that year.

Johnston has stated that, for him, the "I" in the song is God and that songs come from the spirit of creativity in all of us. He has said that the song is not about his Beach Boys bandmate Brian Wilson.

Manilow was initially reluctant to record the song, stating in his autobiography Sweet Life: "The problem with the song was that if you didn't listen carefully to the lyric, you would think that the singer was singing about himself. It could be misinterpreted as a monumental ego trip." After persuasion by Clive Davis, then president of Arista Records, Manilow recorded the song, and his version of "I Write the Songs" was the first single taken from the album Tryin' to Get the Feeling. It first charted on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 15, 1975, reaching the top of the chart nine weeks later, on January 17, 1976.
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David Bowie - Fame - On Young Americans Album (1975)

David Bowie - Fame - On Young Americans Album (1975) WLCY Radio Hits
 David Bowie '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio






"Fame" is a song recorded by David Bowie, initially released in 1975. It reached Number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 during the week of 20 September 1975. The song is included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.

With the Young Americans sessions mostly concluded by late 1974, the material was delayed while Bowie extricated himself from his contract with manager Tony Defries. During this time, he was staying in New York, where he met John Lennon. The pair jammed together, leading to a one-day session at Electric Lady Studios in January 1975. There, Alomar had developed a guitar riff for Bowie's cover of "Footstompin'" by The Flairs, which Bowie thought was "a waste" to give to a cover. Lennon, who was in the studio with them, sang "ame" over the riff, which Bowie turned into "Fame" and he thereafter wrote the rest of the lyrics to the song.

Bowie would later describe the song as "nasty, angry", and fully admitted that the song was written "with a degree of malice" aimed at the Mainman management group with whom he had been working at the time. In 1990, Bowie reflected: "I'd had very upsetting management problems and a lot of that was built into the song. I've left that all that behind me, now... I think fame itself is not a rewarding thing. The most you can say is that it gets you a seat in restaurants."

"Fame" became Bowie's biggest hit to that point in the U.S. It was his first number one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, as well as his first to break the top 10, but would only reach number 17 in the UK.

Bowie would later claim that he had "absolutely no idea" that the song would do so well as a single, saying "I wouldn't know how to pick a single if it hit me in the face."
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Jessi Colter - I'm Not Lisa - On Jessi Colter Collection Album (1975)

Jessi Colter - I'm Not Lisa - On Jessi Colter Collection Album (1975)
Jessi Colter '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"I'm Not Lisa" is a country music song written and recorded by American country artist Jessi Colter. It was released as a single on January 16, 1975 by Capitol Records. "I'm Not Lisa" would become Colter's first major hit as a solo artist.

"I'm Not Lisa" was written by Colter and describes the pain that comes with dating someone who has not gotten over a previous lover. Specifically, the song is about a woman named Julie who laments the fact that her boyfriend keeps mentioning his previous girlfriend, named Lisa.

"I'm Not Lisa" was released on Capitol Records on January 16, 1975, making its debut on the country chart February 15, 1975. The song became Colter's commercial breakthrough as a solo artist, peaking at #1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart. It also was a major crossover Pop hit, peaking at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 and subsequently ranking as the 40th most popular song on Billboard's Year-End chart for 1975. In addition, the song also reached #16 on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart, and was released on Colter's debut Capitol album, I'm Jessi Colter. The song earned Colter a Grammy award nomination in the category of Best Female Country Vocal Performance and a Country Music Association Awards nomination.

Colter's follow-up single "What's Happened to Blue Eyes" became a Top 10 country hit. However, none of her subsequent releases for Capitol in the 1970s came close to the success of "I'm Not Lisa", which became Colter's signature tune and her only #1 single.
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John Denver - Thank God I'm A Country Boy - On Back Home Again Album (1975)

John Denver - Thank God I'm A Country Boy - On Back Home Again Album (1975)
John Denver '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"Thank God I'm a Country Boy", also known as "Country Boy" is a song written by John Martin Sommers and recorded by American singer/songwriter John Denver.

The song was originally included on Denver's 1974 album Back Home Again.

A version recorded live on August 26, 1974 at the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles was included on his 1975 album An Evening with John Denver.

The live version was released as a single and went to No. 1 on both the Billboard magazine Hot Country Singles and Billboard Hot 100 charts. The song topped both charts for one week each, first the country chart (on May 31), and the Hot 100 chart a week later.

"Thank God I'm a Country Boy" was one of six songs released in 1975 that topped both the Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard Hot Country Singles charts. Denver's two-sided hit "I'm Sorry"/"Calypso" also received that distinction.
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Linda Ronstadt - When Will I Be Loved? On Heart Like A Wheel Album (1975)

Linda Ronstadt - When Will I Be Loved On Heart Like A Wheel Album (1975)
Linda Ronstadt '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"When Will I Be Loved" is a classic popular song written by Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers, who had a hit with it in 1960. Linda Ronstadt covered the song in 1975 and her version was an even bigger hit.

The song had its highest profile when Linda Ronstadt covered it on her album Heart Like A Wheel. This version rearranges the verses of the Everly Brothers original, transposing the first and third verses. Capitol Records was reportedly unsure whether to release "When Will I Be Loved" or "You're No Good" as the lead 45 off of Heart Like a Wheel, finally deciding to issue "You're No Good" as the priemier single. "When Will I Be Loved" was issued as the second single (in March, 1975) and hit number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in June of that year, as well number 1 in Cash Box; only the chart dominance of the year's biggest hit: "Love Will Keep Us Together" by Captain & Tennille prevented Ronstadt from having consecutive number 1 hit singles on the Hot 100 — a feat she did perform on the Cash Box Top 100 Singles chart on June 21, 1975, which ranked "When Will I Be Loved" at number 1 ("You're No Good" had been number 1 in both Billboard and Cash Box February 15, 1975). Billboard did afford a number 1 ranking to "When Will I Be Loved" on its C&W chart, where it was Ronstadt's first of several chart-toppers.

As Ronstadt's "When Will I Be Loved" descended the charts, its B-side, a remake of Buddy Holly's "It Doesn't Matter Anymore", garnered enough airplay to chart at number 47 Pop, number 20 Adult Contemporary and number 54 Country.
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John Denver - I'm Sorry (1975)

John Denver - I'm Sorry (1975) on Windsong Album
'70s Lite Rock on WLCY Radio





"I'm Sorry" is a song written and recorded by American country-folk singer-songwriter John Denver. Released in 1975, it was his final number-one pop hit released during his career.

The song, an apology for forsaken love, "I'm Sorry" reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on 27 September 1975, as well as reaching number one on the Easy Listening chart. Six weeks after topping the pop chart, the song was Denver's third and final number one on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart.

The flip side of "I'm Sorry" was "Calypso", and, like its A-side, enjoyed substantial radio airplay on Top 40 stations.
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Major Harris - Love Won't Let Me Wait (1975)

Major Harris - Love Won't Let Me Wait (1975)
Feelin' Soulful in the '70s on WLCY Radio




"Love Won't Let Me Wait" is a hit 1975 single by Major Harris, a former member of R&B/soul group The Delfonics. Written by Vinnie Barrett and Bobby Eli, the single is considered to be a staple of classic soul playlists, and was Harris' only entry into the top five on both the soul and pop charts. The single hit number five on the pop chart, and also hit number one on the soul chart for one week. Billboard ranked it as the No. 24 song for 1975. It was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. on 25 June 1975.
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Freddy Fender - Before The Next Teardrop Falls (1975)

Freddy Fender - Before The Next Teardrop Falls (1975)
'70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio





"Before the Next Teardrop Falls" is an American country and pop song written by Vivian Keith and Ben Peters, and most famously recorded by Freddy Fender.

The song was written in the late 1960s and had been recorded more than two dozen times. The song had achieved modest success in versions by various performers; the original version by Duane Dee reached #44 on the Billboard country chart in early 1968, and Linda Martell sent her version to #33 in early 1970. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a version of the song on his 1969 album, Another Place Another Time.

In 1974, record producer Huey P Meaux approached Fender about overdubbing vocals for an instrumental track. Fender agreed, performing the song bilingual style — singing the first verse in English, then repeating the verse in Spanish.

"The recording only took a few minutes," Fender once told an interviewer. "I was glad to get it over with and I thought that would be the last of it."

However, "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" immediately took off in popularity when released to country radio in January 1975. The song ascended to #1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart in March, spending two weeks atop the chart. Thereafter, the song caught on just as strongly at Top 40 radio stations and it wasn't long before Fender had a #1 Billboard Hot 100 hit as well. Billboard ranked it as the No. 4 song for 1975.

The song is about a man's undaunted determination to save his heart for the just-departed object of his deep (but unrequited) love, and sincere hope that should the woman's new relationship not work out, she will remember his love and return to him.

A showcase of Fender's tenor and Meaux's Tex-Mex musical styling, "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" jump-started his career. (Fender's career had stalled in 1960 after his arrest on drug charges.) In the months and years that followed, Fender recorded several bilingual standards which became major hits, most notably "Secret Love".

BMI Songwriter Sterling Blythe claimed authorship and recalled having sold the rights to a portfolio of songs, among them "Before the Next Teardrop Falls", for $4,500 to settle debts when he left Nashville for the West Coast prior to Fender's recording.
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