Showing posts with label Special. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Special. Show all posts

Special of the day: The Beatles - While My Guitar Gently Weeps (1968)

Special of the day: The Beatles - While My Guitar Gently Weeps (1968)




"While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is a song written by George Harrison, first recorded by the Beatles in 1968 for their eponymous double album (also known as "the White Album"). The song features lead guitar by Eric Clapton, although he was not formally credited on the album.

"While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is ranked at number 136 on Rolling Stone‍ '​s "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time", number 7 on the magazine's list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time, and number 10 on its list of The Beatles 100 Greatest Songs. In an online poll held by Guitar World magazine in February 2012, "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" was voted the best of Harrison's Beatle-era songs. In October 2008, Guitar World ranked Clapton's playing at number 42 in its list of the "100 Greatest Guitar Solos".
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Special of the day: The Archies - Sugar, Sugar (1969)

Special of the day: The Archies - Sugar, Sugar (1969)




"Sugar, Sugar" is a pop song written by Jeff Barry and Andy Kim. It was originally recorded by the Archies, a bubble gum pop band formed by a group of fictional teenagers in the television cartoon series The Archie Show. It reached number one in the US on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1969 and stayed there for four weeks. It was also number one on the UK Singles chart in that same year for eight weeks. The song became a hit again in 1970 when R&B and soul singer Wilson Pickett took it back onto the charts.

The Archies' "Sugar, Sugar" was the 1969 number-one single of the year. A week after topping the RPM 100 national singles chart in Canada on September 13, 1969 (where it spent three weeks), it went on to spend four weeks at the top of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 from September 20 and eight weeks at the top of the UK singles chart. In total, it spent 22 weeks in the Billboard Hot 100. The song lists at number 73 on Billboard's Greatest Songs of All Time. It also peaked at one in the South African Singles Chart. On February 5, 2006, "Sugar, Sugar" was inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, as co-writer Andy Kim is originally from Montreal, Quebec.

In the United States, "Sugar, Sugar" was classified by the RIAA as a gold record in August 1969, meaning it sold 1 million units (the gold threshold was later lowered to 500,000). The single also topped the 1969 Billboard Year-End chart. "Sugar, Sugar" is listed as the 73rd top hit of all-time in Billboards 55th year anniversary edition
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Special Of The Day: The Ronettes - Be My Baby (1963) - One of the greatest pop records ever made

Brian Wilson has declared 'Be My Baby' the greatest pop record ever made







"Be My Baby" is a song written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich and Phil Spector. It was first recorded and released by American girl group The Ronettes as a single in August 1963 and later placed on their 1964 debut LP Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes featuring Veronica. Spector produced their elaborately layered recording in what is now largely considered the ultimate embodiment of his Wall of Sound production formula.

It is considered one of the best songs of the 1960s by Pitchfork Media, NME and Time. In 2004, the song was ranked 22 by Rolling Stone in its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and described as a "Rosetta stone for studio pioneers such as the Beatles and Brian Wilson," a notion supported by Allmusic who writes, "No less an authority than Brian Wilson has declared 'Be My Baby' the greatest pop record ever made — no arguments here." In 1999, it was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame, and in 2006, the Library of Congress honored the Ronettes' version by adding it to the United States National Recording Registry.

"Be My Baby" was recorded in July of 1963 at Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles. Spector recorded a range of instruments including guitars, saxophones, multiple pianos, and horns with innovative studio mixing and over-dubbing. Spector described his production method as "a Wagnerian approach to rock & roll", which became known as the wall of sound. "Be My Baby" was one of the first times Phil Spector used a full orchestra in his recording. The drums were played by Hal Blaine. Darlene Love and Sonny and Cher were part of the group of guests that provided additional backup vocals. Guitars on the session were played by Tommy Tedesco and Bill Pitman, after whom the instrumental "Tedesco and Pitman" on the B-side of the single was named.

"Be My Baby" was the first Ronettes song produced by Phil Spector released on his label, Philles Records. The group had already recorded a track by Greenwich and Barry called "Why Don't They Let Us Fall in Love", but this was held back in favor of "Be My Baby".

The song was arranged by Spector regular Jack Nitzsche and engineered by Larry Levine. Ronnie Spector is the only Ronette to appear on the record.
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Special of the day: Etta James - Security (1968)

Special of the day: Etta James - Security (1968)





"Security" is a song written by Ottis Redding and Margaret Wessen and performed by Etta James, from the album Tell Mama: The Complete Muscle Shoals Sessions.

As the Album title suggests, this is the definitive edition of Etta James' Tell Mama long-player. For this single-disc release the original album is augmented with five previously unissued tracks -- documented during James' four Muscle Shoals sessions circa '67-'68. The question of why a rural Alabama town became a conduit for some of the most memorable and instantly identifiable grooves may still be up for debate. The evidence exists in droves and Tell Mama could certainly be considered exhibit A. These sessions feature the same impact that would redirect several first ladies of soul. Notable among them are Dusty Springfield's Dusty in Memphis, Aretha Franklin's I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You) and to somewhat lesser acclaim, Jackie DeShannon's Jackie. Tell Mama showcases some of the unique and admittedly darker qualities of what might best be described as R&B noir. "I'd Rather Go Blind," "Steal Away," "I'm Gonna Take What He's Got" all exemplify the essence of the blues -- making the best of a bad situation. The flipside of the sombre subject matter is the satisfying conviction in the music -- which is where the remastering becomes particularly noticeable.
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Special of the day: Roy Orbinson - Only The Lonely (1960)

Special of the day: Roy Orbinson - Only The Lonely (1960)





"Only the Lonely (Know the Way I Feel)" is a 1960 song written by Roy Orbison and Joe Melson. Produced by Fred Foster for Monument Records it became the first major hit for Orbison. As an operatic rock ballad, it was a sound unheard of at the time except It's Now or Never by Elvis Presley, described by the New York Times as expressing "a clenched, driven urgency". It is seen as a seminal event in the evolution of Rock and Roll. Released as a 45rpm single by Monument Records in May 1960, "Only the Lonely" went to No. 2 on the United States Billboard pop music charts on 25 July 1960 (blocked by Brenda Lee's "I'm Sorry") & No. 14 on the Billboard R&B charts. "Only the Lonely" reached Number One in the United Kingdom, a position it achieved on 20 October 1960, staying there for two weeks (out of a total of 24 weeks spent on the UK singles chart from 28 July 1960). the personnel who were featured on the original recording included Orbison's session regulars Buddy Harman on drums, Floyd Cramer on piano and Bob Moore on bass with Hank Garland and Harold Bradley on guitar.

In 1999, "Only the Lonely" was honored with a Grammy Hall of Fame Award. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked it No. 232 on their list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.
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Special of the day: Dream Lover By Bobby Darin (1959)

Special of the day: Dream Lover By Bobby Darin (1959)



"Dream Lover" is a song written and recorded by Bobby Darin on March 5, 1959. Darin decided to stretch out some chord changes he found on the piano, and add strings and voices. It was produced by Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler and engineered by Tom Dowd. The song became a multi-million seller, reaching #2 in US charts for a week and #4 on the R&B charts. "Dream Lover" was kept from the number one spot by "The Battle of New Orleans" by Johnny Horton and went to #1 in UK for four weeks during June and July 1959 respectively. It was released as a single on Atco Records in 1959. In addition to Darin's vocal, the song features Neil Sedaka on piano. A picture sleeve, featuring a portrait of Darin, was also issued for this record.

The song is featured in the 1991 movie Hot Shots! starring Charlie Sheen. A remake of the song performed by Dion is also played in full, during the end credits. The song was also used in Michael Apted's 1974 movie Stardust and in Barry Levinson's 1982 debut film Diner. A version of the song, retitled "Dream Maker" and with rewritten lyrics, appears in the pilot of the 1987 TV series Rags to Riches.
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Special of the day: Stand by Me by Ben E. King

Special of the day: Stand by Me by Ben E. King

Stand by Me is a song originally performed by American singer-songwriter Ben E. King. It was written by King, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, inspired by the spiritual "Lord Stand by Me", plus two lines rooted in Psalms 46:2–3. There have been over 400 recorded versions of the song. The song is featured on the soundtrack of the 1986 film Stand by Me.

According to the documentary History of Rock 'n' Roll, Ben E. King had no intention of recording the song himself when he wrote it. King had written it for The Drifters, who passed on recording it. After the "Spanish Harlem" recording session, he had some studio time left over. The session's producers, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, asked if he had any more songs. King played "Stand by Me" on the piano for them. They liked it and called the studio musicians back in to record it.

Stoller recalls it differently:

I remember arriving at our office as Jerry and Ben were working on lyrics for a new song. King had the beginnings of a melody that he was singing a cappella. I went to the piano and worked up the harmonies, developing a bass pattern that became the signature of the song. Ben and Jerry quickly finished the lyrics ... .



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Special of the day: The Beatles - Here Comes The Sun

Special of the day: The Beatles - Here Comes The Sun


Here Comes the Sun is a song written by George Harrison from the Beatles' 1969 album Abbey Road.

"Here Comes the Sun" is one of Harrison's best-known Beatles contributions alongside "Something" and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps." The year 1969 was difficult for Harrison: he had quit the band temporarily, he was arrested for marijuana possession, and he had his tonsils removed.

Harrison stated in his autobiography, I, Me, Mine:

"Here Comes the Sun" was written at the time when Apple was getting like school, where we had to go and be businessmen: 'Sign this' and 'sign that.' Anyway, it seems as if winter in England goes on forever, by the time spring comes you really deserve it. So one day I decided I was going to sag off Apple and I went over to Eric Clapton's house. The relief of not having to go see all those dopey accountants was wonderful, and I walked around the garden with one of Eric's acoustic guitars and wrote "Here Comes the Sun."
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Special of the day: Steppenwolf - Born To Be Wild (song)

Special of the day: Steppenwolf - Born To Be Wild (song)


Born to Be Wild is a song first performed by the band Steppenwolf, written by Mars Bonfire. The song is often invoked in both popular and counter culture to denote a biker appearance or attitude. It is sometimes described as the first heavy metal song, and the second verse lyric "heavy metal thunder" marks the first use of this term in rock music (although not as a description of a musical style).

"Born to Be Wild" was the band's third single off their 1968 debut album Steppenwolf and became their most successful single, reaching No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles charts. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine placed "Born to Be Wild" at No. 129 on the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list. Also in 2004, it finished at #29 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema. In 2009, it was named the 53rd best hard rock song of all time by VH1.
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The Supremes - Stop! In the Name of Love - Special of the day

The Supremes - Stop! In the Name of Love on WLCY Radio


"Stop! In the Name of Love" was the fourth #1 hit for the Supremes in a row when it came out in early 1965. The choruses tended to be the main hooks of the songs Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Eddie Holland wrote for the Supremes, and that might be even more true of "Stop! In the Name of Love" than it is of most of their other hits. 

"Stop! In the Name of Love" was a little different from the first triumvirate of Supremes chart-toppers ("Where Did Our Love Go," "Baby Love," and "Come See About Me") in that it was a little more dramatic and assertive. That was particular true of that oft-repeated chorus, which hit a minor key in which the Supremes declared the title phrase in semi-operatic tones. The message was softened a little by the second part of the chorus, in which the melody got gentler and the group cautioned, "think it over." The verses are less dramatic and strident than the famous chorus, but have a nice fetching strong melody, and a more conciliatory, vulnerable attitude toward romance than the message delivered by the song's title. It's also neat the way the verse and chorus both end with the mini-hook of the Supremes singing-warning "think it over." 

Listen, too, for the very beginning of the song, where a super-brief upwards organ slide pulls the track into gear like a crane lifting a car out of a swamp. While the first quintet of #1 Supremes hits in 1964-65 did tend to sound similar to each other, "Stop! In the Name of Love" is one of the stronger of the five, and made a further imprint on the public with the famous dance (with the Supremes making stop signs with their hands) the group devised when performing it on stage and TV.
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Special of the day: Sam And Dave - Hold On, I'm Comin'

Special of the day: Sam And Dave - Hold On, I'm Comin'
Hold On, I'm Comin' (officially registered song title with album Hold On, I'm Comin '​ titled after the song) listed on a Stax release as "Hold On! I'm a Comin'" is a 1966 single recorded by soul duo Sam & Dave, issued on the Atlantic-distributed Stax label in 1966.

The song was written by the songwriting team of Isaac Hayes and David Porter, who came up with the title of the song spontaneously when Hayes was trying to get Porter to hurry out of the Stax Studios restroom and get back to songwriting. Released as Stax 189 in the spring of 1966, the single peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot Black Singles chart, and at number 21 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States.

A revamped version of the song, "Hold On, Edwin's Coming", was recorded by Sam & Dave as a promotional single for Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards' third election campaign in 1982. Three years later, Dave Prater teamed with new singing partner Sam Daniels as "The New Sam and Dave Review", and recorded "Medley/Hold On, I'm Comin'" for Atlantic Records.

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